The Meaning of Life Part 3 (the last part)

When I started talking about the meaning of life I wanted to write one blog about it and get on with it. But even though I am an expert in thinking above my mind and can explain things like you wouldn’t believe, I got extracted along the way and this has ended up being three parts long which I didn’t plan on or I would have told you at the beginning so you could have made arrangements ahead of time. This goes to show the saying about the best lame plans of mice and men. But as they also say “how much wood would a woodchuck chuck” and “don’t count your chickens in one batch.” So I guess “all swell that ends swell.”

Anyway, I’m going to jump right into what the meaning of life really is and not go over all the mistakes everybody else has made about it like I already talked about in the other parts. If you are more of a smart person you will probably be interested in them so if you haven’t read them yet click on these: Part 1 and Part 2. If you’re not all that smart and just want to get on to the crust of the matter then keep reading and I’ll eventually get to it I’m pretty sure.

A big question before you can get on to the actual question is why would anybody want to know the meaning of life in the first place? This is what you call a prequestion or prerequisition (same thing almost), which is a technical word that means any question that comes before the real question but isn’t actually a part of the real question. Some people would ask why you’d even deal with a question like that since it isn’t even the question you want to know the answer of. That question is called a preprequestion (another technical word) which most megaphysical persons would draw the line at due to the danger of what you call logical regurgitation. So I won’t bother you with that.

Anyway, as I was saying before I interrupted myself, you might want to know why you would want to know the meaning of life in the first place. Here is where history comes in handy, though as I said before HERE, history is usually not all that big a deal. In this case, history shows us that when people don’t care what the meaning of life is they cause a lot of trouble for the rest of us. Take the Vikings as an example for instance. All they could come up with in life was long row boats and hats with horns sticking out. This gave them an interiority complex so they went out in those silly boats and hats and raided other towns and killed people. If anybody had asked a Viking what the meaning of life was the Viking would have axed his head off and laughed. Then there was Atilla the Hun who basically killed everybody who wasn’t a Hun. Since nobody really knew what a Hun was, Atilla pretty much had his pick of people to kill. He is famous for saying after every slaughter, “Hun fun done gotta run son.” And nobody who could say that with a straight face has a clue about the meaning of life.

My point is that wanting to know the meaning of life in the first place keeps you from doing really stupid stuff, and that’s even if you don’t actually find out what the meaning of life is but only want to. All the really neat stuff comes from trying to find out the meaning of life, like for example music and art and books and toothpaste. The fact of it is that most neat stuff we end up with is what you call a side effect of just wanting to know the meaning of life. The facts show that when somebody actually finds out the meaning of life they aren’t all that interesting anymore and they don’t invent cool stuff anymore. So even though I pretty much have the meaning of life in the bag so to speak, I still appreciate the fact that there are a lot of people still pretty much clueless abut it.

Okay, so now I guess we’re finally ready to move on to the actual meaning of life, which means I will have to write one more of these parts so you aren’t left hanging like two sheets in the wind.

The Meaning of Life — the Last Part (for serious)

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